In Other News

‘Winter is coming’: What do climate scientists predict for Southern California?

By Steve Scauzillo|

Activists, travel industry square off over aviation’s climate-changing consequences

When people debate air pollution in Southern California, images of the usual suspects arise — trucks belching diesel fumes, aging jalopies not yet snagged by the smog-testing authorities and smokestacks towering over refineries and other heavy ...

By Rachel Uranga|

MOST RECENT STORIES

  • National parks

    Senior passes to national parks will soon cost $80. Here’s how to get one for $10

    If you’re a senior citizen who likes to visit national parks, there’s a deal you should know about before it’s gone. The National Park Service is boosting the price of a lifetime pass for seniors — known as the America the Beautiful, National Parks & Federal Recreational Lands Senior Pass — from $10 to $80 on Monday, Aug. 28. In some local spots, Friday may be your last chance to get one before the price hike. The pass is good for entry at...

    Ryan Carter
    |

  • Wildlife poaching and smuggling

    Perris teen tells judge he bought tiger cub on streets of Tijuana

    SAN DIEGO >> A California teenager who says he bought a Bengal tiger cub on the streets of Tijuana for $300 was arrested when he tried to bring it into the United States in his 2017 Chevy Camaro. Luis Eudoro Valencia was charged with smuggling a Bengal tiger into the United States after U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials found the furry cub lying on the floor of the passenger side of his car during an inspection around 1:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Otay Mesa border...

    By Julie Watson Associated Press|

  • Legislation

    First-ever water tax proposed to tackle unsafe drinking water in California

    SACRAMENTO >> For the first time Californians would pay a tax on drinking water, 95 cents per month, under legislation to fix hundreds of public water systems with unsafe tap water — a problem that’s most pervasive in rural areas with agricultural runoff. Senate Bill 623, backed by a strange-bedfellows coalition of the agricultural lobby and environmental groups but opposed by water districts, would generate $2 billion over the next 15 years to clean up contaminated...

    By Katy Murphy kmurphy@ bayareanewsgroup.com|

  • Natural resource management

    Interior Department won’t eliminate national monuments but some may shrink

    The San Gabriel Mountains National Monument, as well as others ordered reviewed by President Donald Trump, will not be eliminated, but many should be reduced in size, according to documents released Thursday. U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke will not recommend eliminating any national monuments but will suggest changes to “a handful” of sites. He left open the possibility of more drilling and mining on some sites, The Associated Press reported. Zinke said he would...

    Steve Scauzillo
    |

  • Environmental policy

    100 supporters, 4 local members of Congress blast Trump’s review of national monuments

    LOS ANGELES >> At a rally Tuesday, four local members of Congress blasted President Trump’s executive order that called for the review of dozens of national monuments, which they fear could mean scaling back or eliminating those protected natural areas entirely. Among the 21 monuments under review are the San Gabriel Mountains, which President Obama dedicated in 2014. During his time in the White House, Obama dedicated 34 national monuments under the 1906...

    Steve Scauzillo
    |

  • Climate change

    Report: California needs to address housing crisis to meet long-term climate change goals

    California’s economy grew robustly during the past decade even as state-imposed environmental standards to combat climate-change helped lower greenhouse gas emissions. But authors of a report released Tuesday cautioned that the future might not be so rosy: They found that transportation-related emissions have begun to rise due in part to longer commute times for California workers who can’t afford to live in the cities where they work. The report cautioned that the...

    Lauren Williams
    |

  • Zoological parks

    Buddy the blind sea lion gets new home at the Los Angeles Zoo

    LOS ANGELES >> After an eight-year absence, a California sea lion has returned to the Los Angeles Zoo’s Sea Life Cliffs exhibit, it was announced Monday. Buddy, a blind, 10-year-old, 700-pound sea lion arrived at the zoo on May 24 after being rescued and rehabilitated by the Marine Mammal Care Center Los Angeles. “Buddy has definitely brought a new sense of excitement to Sea Life Cliffs,” said Jennifer Kuypers, senior animal keeper at the Los Angeles...

    City News Service|

  • Drinking water quality

    Drinking lead: Why California may force all schools to test their water

    When a therapy dog refused to drink at a San Diego grade school, it was the first clue that something was wrong with the water. Tests revealed why the pup turned up its nose—the presence of polyvinyl chloride, the polymer in PVC pipes that degrade over time. But further analysis found something else that had gone undetected by the dog, the teachers and students of the San Diego Cooperative Charter School, and the school district: elevated levels of lead. Nor is this an...

    By Elizabeth Aguilera CALmatters|

  • Solar power

    Van Nuys Airport gets first solar rooftop project, Long Beach Airport may be next

    When Curt Castagna built four new airplane hangars at Van Nuys Airport, he started to think about all the wasted space — on the roof. So he decided to fill up that space by going into the solar energy business, a first for his group and a first for the general aviation airport. Castagna, CEO of Aeroplex/Aerolease Group, a company that builds and manages properties at airports, announced Thursday it will partner with Los Angeles-based PCS Energy to add rooftop solar to the...

    Steve Scauzillo
    |

  • Invasive species

    What’s best weapon for battling species invading California waters? Data

    There’s an invasion plaguing the coastal waters of Southern California. Waves of tiny interlopers spark havoc at fisheries, clog municipal water pipes and frustrate boaters who must dislodge buckets of sea crud. They’ve altered our coastal regions’ ecosystems, endangered native fish and birthed such nasty problems as “swimmer’s itch.” Accelerated in recent decades by international trade, invasive sea creatures have hitchhiked here...

    Rachel Uranga
    |

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